Series: "War Correspondents Throughout History: Edward R. Morrow" by Scott Lyons

Edward R. Murrow was not just any ordinary journalist during World War II. He was a broadcasting giant who revolutionized the way mass media reported on war. His voice was synonymous with a passionate commitment to telling the truth, no matter the cost. Edward R. Murrow remains one of the most cherished journalists of our time. His approach to journalism revolutionized the industry, and his work remains a yardstick to measure true professionalism in news reporting. As a journalist during World War II, Murrow’s contribution was nothing short of exceptional. He provided an in-depth, honest, and informative account of the war, bringing the stories of brave soldiers and civilians to millions of people across the globe. Murrow was born in 1908 in Guilford County, North Carolina. He grew up in the era of radio, and by the time he was in his twenties, he had already become a renowned journalist in radio broadcasting. His love for radio, and his hunger for the truth, made him a household…

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"7 December 1941: America is Pulled into World War II: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii is attacked" by Scott Lyons

Right: The caption reads "Captured Japanese photograph showing the first moments of the attack. A torpedo has just hit USS West Virginia on the far side of Ford Island (center), and a Japanese plane is visible to the right of the plume. USS Oklahoma just to the right of West Virginia is already listing from torpedo hits. On the near side of Ford Isalnd, to the left, are light cruisers Detroit and Raleigh, target and training ship Utah and seaplane tender Tangier. Raleigh and Utah have been torpedoed, and Utah is listing sharply to port." Source: War History Network license through the National WWII Museum. Click to enlarge. On 26 November 1941, a Japanese task force of six aircraft carriers--Akagi (carrying 64 planes), Kaga (carrying 71 planes), Soryu (carrying 53 planes), Hiryu (carrying 51 planes), Shokaku (carrying 58 planes), and Zuikaku (carrying 58 planes), each equipped at maximum capacity, departed from Hittokapu Bay, Japan. (Prange 1981, 375) Their destination was a position…

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"24 October 1929: Global Economic Crisis Creates Political Instability and Ultimately World War" by Scott Lyons

The Great Depression was a catastrophic economic event that had its origins in the United States in the aftermath of World War I but soon spread to the rest of the world. The roaring twenties, as they came to be known, brought prosperity and considerable wealth to the Americans. However, the good times were not to last, and a series of economic crises led to one of the most severe economic downturns in human history and ultimately to another World War. War and major historical events don't occur in a vacuum. World War II can be debated in this sense. The causes of World War II include but are not limited to political takeovers, ideologies, militarism, invasions, and the continuation of nationalism from World War I. But what are the underlying crises that put Germany and Japan over the edge? More specifically, what were the catalysts for Germany's Lebensraum and Japan's imperialism? The first sign of trouble came in 1929 when the American stock market declined after a small crash in…

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From the National WWII Museum: a tribute to Queen Elizabeth II

The National WWII Museum has posted an insightful and touching tribute to Queen Elizabeth II on their Home page. Check it out if you have the time and let us know your thoughts below. I'm touched by her selflessness during Nazi Germany's attacks on Great Britain. That she volunteered to join the women's branch of the British Army as a mechanic is incredible. From the National WWII Museum: Tribute to Queen Elizabeth II

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20 August 1940: Churchill's "Never Was So Much Owed By So Many To So Few" speech

November 1940: Coventry, England. Photograph by Captain Horton, War Office official photographer. This is photograph H14250 from the collections of the Imperial War Museums. Winston Churchill walking through the ruined nave of Coventry Cathedral, England, after it was severely damaged in the Coventry Blitz of 14–15th November 1940. Photograph in the Public Domain. Left: Panorama of Parliament Square and Queen Elizabeth Tower in London, United Kingdom. Photograph licensed to War History Network. Click to expand. On 20 August 1940 British Prime Minister Winston Churchill gave his famous "Never was so much owed by so many to so few" speech in response to the courage exhibited by British flyers in response to the air attack by Nazi Germany. Here are two excerpts from the 55-plus minute speech: "The gratitude of every home in our Island, in our Empire, and indeed throughout the world, except in the abodes of the guilty, goes out to the British airmen who, undaunted by odds, unwearied in…

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Courtesy of Archives Branch, Marine Corps History Division. 

Photo Album: Women Marines in World War One

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